Logjam Presents

Lake Street Dive

Dustbowl Revival

The ELM

Bozeman, MT
Add to Calendar 09/21/2021 20:00 09/22/2021 01:00 America/Boise Lake Street Dive

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome Lake Street Dive for a live in concert performance at The ELM on September 21, 2021. Tickets go on sale Friday, June 18, 2021 at 10:00AM online or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. Reserved premium balcony seating and general admission standing room tickets are available. All ages are welcome…. Continue Reading

Logjam Presents - Missoula, Montana false MM/DD/YYYY
7:00PM (door) 8:00PM (show)
$35-$40 (Adv.) + applicable fees
All Ages
Sold Out Ticket Waiting List

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome Lake Street Dive for a live in concert performance at The ELM on September 21, 2021.

Tickets go on sale Friday, June 18, 2021 at 10:00AM online or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. Reserved premium balcony seating and general admission standing room tickets are available. All ages are welcome.

Additional ticketing and venue information can be found here.

About Lake Street Dive

As a band, Lake Street Dive epitomizes democracy in action: the group, expanded into a quintet since touring keyboardist Akie Bermiss officially joined in 2017, share writing and arrangement duties. Their personalities, skills, and wide-ranging taste in pop, rock, R&B, and jazz have long blended together to make an impressively cohesive sound, both sophisticated and playful, combining retro influences with contemporary attitude. On its most recent Nonesuch album, 2018’s Free Yourself Up, the band even produced the record itself.

But, after being on the road for nearly eighteen months since that album, the band members decided they could use some outside help. They had been writing, swapping demos, and rehearsing before and after soundchecks or in backstage green rooms and had amassed a wealth of new material, full songs, and sketches. With more than three dozen new songs and the desire to make a concise, vinyl-length album, they turned to Mike Elizondo, the producer-songwriter-multi- instrumentalist whom Lake Street Dive fans might remember as music director of Chris Thile’s public radio series, Live From Here. The Grammy Award-winning Elizondo is perhaps best known as a songwriting collaborator of Dr. Dre, Eminem, and 50 Cent, but he has also served as a record producer for Fiona Apple, Mary J. Blige, Carrie Underwood, and 21 Pilots, among many others. He is as conversant in jazz as in rock, country, bluegrass, and hip hop—exactly the sort of genre-juggling guy who would appreciate Lake Street Dive’s own versatility.

Obviously is titled after the first word in the lyrics of opening track “Hypotheticals.” And it is obvious from the start that the band has homed in on Elizondo’s hip-hop record- making expertise, because, on this material, the grooves run especially deep. A sense of rhythmic fun drives just about every track, from up-tempo numbers like “Hush Money” to a bittersweet slow dance like “Anymore.” The quintet fashions disarmingly cheerful arrangements guaranteed to keep the party going even as the subject matter takes a more serious turn on lead-off single, “Making Do,” about a younger generation facing a life of diminished expectations, and “Being a Woman,” a finger-snapping, bird-flipping treatise on gender inequality. “Nobody’s Stopping You Now” is a letter of encouragement from lead vocalist Rachael Price to her teenaged self, co-written with bassist Bridget Kearney.

Though they still excel at songs like “Lackluster Lover,” poking sly fun at a hapless Lothario, Lake Street Dive has also figured out how to write tunes that reflect this particularly turbulent chapter in our shared history. As Price puts it, “You’re trying to express your anxieties, your feelings, your sadness, your happiness, all of these things—your authentic state of being in a song. But you’re also trying to create something people will listen to over and over again. That’s the unique fun thing about music, putting these messages into three and a half minute snippets, dropping whatever truth we can and hoping it’s the type of thing that people want to ruminate on.”

With the permanent addition of Bermiss to the line-up, Lake Street Dive gained another singer and songwriter, as well as a keyboardist. Vocal harmonies have been a strong suit since the band’s earliest days in Boston, when the original foursome became a YouTube sensation for its impromptu sidewalk singing. Here, with Elizondo’s encouragement, the group vocals are among their most inventive. On “Same Old News,” Price and Bermiss do a lighthearted and sexy Roberta Flack/Donny Hathaway-style duet. Album closer “Sarah” is performed a cappella, and it is as lush and emotive as an orchestrated piece.

“We had so much fun in the studio making Free Yourself Up,” recounts Kearney. “But we’ve been a band for so long that we didn’t want to just become a feedback loop of our own ideas. It felt like a really good time to bring another person like Mike [Elizondo], and he really opened us up. He encouraged us to make bolder arrangement choices, take those chances and try those things. The record really is a success in what we set out to do: continue to challenge ourselves, continue to grow, and do things we’ve never done before.”

“Throughout our recording projects, our frame of reference has come from classic rock and ’70s AM gold,” explains McDuck. “But in terms of modern production aesthetics, no one is getting it right more than hip hop. There are a lot of great rock and roll records too, but there are aesthetic choices that we, as a rock band, always struggled with when it came time to mix. So, it was great to work with someone as musically omnivorous as Mike [Elizondo], who’s had all that success and fluency in the hip hop world but can also hang when it came time to talk about double bass.”

Prior to joining Elizondo at his suburban Nashville studio, Lake Street Dive had been on what would now be an unthinkably jam-packed schedule: concert dates, Brandi Carlile’s “Girls Just Wanna Weekend” festival on the Caribbean coast of Mexico, and the annual Cayamo Cruise back east, a floating music festival with Jeff Tweedy, Mavis Staples, the Watkins Family Hour, and more. They managed to complete the recording—and even an album-cover photo shoot—before the pandemic lockdown. The studio, filled with an abundance of guitars, amps, keyboards, and synthesizers all prepped for their use, was an ideal, semi- secluded location for the band to build these tracks from the ground up.

“Playing it live all together as a start is never a bad idea,” says drummer Mike Calabrese. “Even if we didn’t keep anything but the high hat, everyone’s in there getting a feel for the arrangement. But there were other songs that were constructed piece by piece. ‘Sarah’ was the first song we recorded because we had all the voices we needed. ‘Feels Like the Last Time,’ which starts with Akie beat boxing—he beat boxed to his own demo of the song and Mike [Elizondo] was like, ‘That’s a good tempo, let’s just use that.’ We cut that up, flew it around, and pieced the song out and added layers to it bit by bit.”

Bermiss had already integrated himself into Lake Street Dive as a live performer, touring with them for the last five years, but he has now revealed himself to be a songwriter able to get right into the band’s groove. His beat-boxing skills were an inadvertent bonus. Kearney notes, “This was the first time we got to collaborate with Akie as a writer. He really brought a lot of stuff to the table. It’s pretty remarkable that you can add somebody to a band after fourteen years and have this completely new writer who fits into the grand scheme.”

Bermiss uses the word “organic” to describe how he came to work with Lake Street Dive, starting with an invitation to go on tour with them back in 2015, after the band had caught him performing a gig of his own. That led to his joining them on the Free Yourself Up sessions, and, finally, to a night in Chicago where, he recalls, “There was a formal ‘engagement’ situation. They took me to dinner and told me it was a band thing they like to do, and while I was distracted, they each put plastic engagement rings on my plate and asked if I would take their musical hands in band marriage.”

Choosing an album title was organic as well. Price says, “Naming our albums has always been a painstaking process. Obviously is the first word in the song ‘Hypotheticals’—an undeniable dance track, a great way to say, ‘We are back!’ We went through a couple of title iterations, then one day we were like ‘Obviously—let’s call the record Obviously.’ It was—in a word—obviously the right one.”

Dustbowl Revival

About Dustbowl Revival

Dustbowl Revival has always been about pushing the boundaries of what American roots music can be. After celebrating over a decade of sonic adventuring and playing thousands of shows together in ten countries and counting, the group collected a devoted fanbase coast-to-coast. After throwing five of their own virtual Sway-At-Home festivals during the shut-down featuring nearly forty artists, the always evolving group of string and brass players led by founding members Z. Lupetin, Josh Heffernan, Ulf Bjorlin are excited to welcome a new wave of talent to the band, after emerging from a pandemic touring hiatus.

After spending years on the road, selling out hometown shows at LA’s famed Troubadour, headlining festivals and wowing crowds from Denmark to China, Dustbowl Revival never stopped making their joyful, booty-shaking soul songs and cut-to-heart folk-rock ballads that lift up their transcendent live shows.

Even so, with the bands emotional new single “Beside You” and 2020’s ambitious full length Is It You, Is It Me, they wanted to strike into new terrain. As they mined new energetic material from the place where folk and funk music meet, they teamed up with producer Sam Kassirer (Lake Street Dive, Josh Ritter) and engineer Brian Joseph (Bon Iver, Sufjan Stevens). The latest album strikes a more personal note than ever before, representing the latest stage in a band that never stops exploring new sounds.

Many of the songs feel like small theater pieces coming to life verse by verse. It’s the yin-yang conversational harmony that is the true specialty of lead songwriter and singer Z. Lupetin, who also doubles as a playwright and recently wrote the music for a Greek tragedy set in Gold Rush era California. While longtime co-lead Liz Beebe has stepped away from the band after a long run, an amazing young talent in Lashon Halley has stepped in to bring new life to the songs, matching Lupetin’s intense vocal range with her own. The

With a big brass-and-strings band building around the voices, Is It You, Is It Me isn’t afraid to explore the personal and political tension that the group may have shied away from facing before. The album tackles uneasy topics, often where the political feels personal, especially in the defiant “Get Rid of You,” which was inspired by the student activists who emerged from the tragic Parkland High School shooting in Florida. The ominous driving brass groove of “Enemy,” hones in on a painful generational split between a daughter and her parents who may have voted in a tyrant, and have become strangers to her. This yearning search for common ground pervades the record as a whole.

Where the band really sets on a new course is on lushly cinematic, orchestrated set pieces like “Mirror,” “Runaway” and, most notably, the current fan favorite and live showstopper “Sonic Boom,” about the struggle to reveal who you really are in the hidden, rose-colored world of social media. There’s a new widescreen expansiveness to these songs that wouldn’t be out of place in a packed arena or orchestra hall with a full neon light show. Acting like a nimble rock orchestra, during the recording process, each member played multiple instruments, and the group brought in new musicians on symphonic brass, and local friends to sing as a spur-of-the-moment choir.

If one thing is clear, Is It You, Is It Me represents another large leap forward for Dustbowl Revival, coming after their acclaimed self-titled 2017 album. Produced by Grammy-winner Ted Hutt (Old Crow Medicine Show, Drop Kick Murphy’s), it transitioned the group from a “roots dance party band” that continues to thrive on the festival circuit, to a nuanced ensemble embracing more soulful territory without losing their original fire. That self-titled record was a direct bridge to the newest work, rising number to one on the Amazon Americana chart and featuring a funky favorite “Honey I Love You” where the band joyfully teaming up with blues master Keb Mo’. Their heartache folk number “Got Over”, surprised the band by racking up over seven million streams and counting online. “Beside You” stayed in the Americana charts for months and “Enemy” became a staple on SiriusXM, especially during the 2020 election. To top it off, Billboard Magazine added about that Is It You, Is It Me is “the biggest sonic work of the Venice, Calif.-based troupe’s career.”

Dustbowl Revival’s story started humbly. Nearly thirteen years ago Z. Lupetin, a Chicago native who attended college in Michigan came to L.A. to be a screenwriter, grew disillusioned with his job in advertising, and placed a hopeful ad on Craigslist. He sought to find fellow musicians who shared his roving love of Louis Armstrong, Bob Wills, Old Crow Medicine Show, Paul Simon, Aretha Franklin and the brass bands of New Orleans, but also wanted to write songs like Americana pioneers Wilco, Lucinda Williams and even Bruce Springsteen. There are still players in the group who responded to that initial odd quest. New talent on electric guitar, piano and more are joining in for 2021.

“Maybe we don’t know where this journey will take us or how long it will last,” acknowledges Lupetin, “That’s my take on the importance of what we try to do. Music elevates us, lifts us up, makes us change our minds, takes us out of our comfort zones. If just one person can be moved by just one song, that’s enough.”