Logjam Presents

Mumford & Sons

Portugal The Man

Ogren Park

Missoula, MT
Add to Calendar 08/11/2019 19:30 08/11/2019 11:00 pm America/Boise Mumford & Sons

Logjam Presents is excited to welcome Grammy award winning, British folk rock band Mumford & Sons to Ogren Park for a live performance on August 11, 2019. Limited Ticket Release Limited Release Tickets go on sale to the general public this Friday, March 22 and will be available for purchase online here starting 10am MDT, by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849, or… Continue Reading

Logjam Presents - Missoula, Montana false MM/DD/YYYY
6:00PM (door) 7:30PM (show)
$75$-$90 (Adv.) + applicable fees
All Ages
Sold Out Ticket Waiting List

Logjam Presents is excited to welcome Grammy award winning, British folk rock band Mumford & Sons to Ogren Park for a live performance on August 11, 2019.

Limited Ticket Release

Limited Release Tickets go on sale to the general public this Friday, March 22 and will be available for purchase online here starting 10am MDT, by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849, or in person at the Top Hat Box Office starting at 11am MDT while supplies lasts.

Premium Standing Pit: General admission pit tickets allow access to the standing room only section located directly in front of the stage.

General Admission: General Admission tickets allow access to the standing room section of the stadium located just behind preferred pit section.

Additional ticketing information and policies can be found here.

All concerts are held rain or shine. Be prepared for extremes such as sunshine, heat, wind or rain. All tickets are non-refundable. In the event of cancellation due to extreme weather, tickets will not be refunded.

About Verified Fan Presale

About Mumford & Sons

Already receiving widespread praise for their sold-out live performances, the Albany Times Union declares, “Mumford & Sons has developed into an arena-rock juggernaut,” while The Washington Post proclaims, “The U.K. quartet thrilled a packed Capital One Arena crowd…undeniably wondrous arena rock anthems” and Billboard asserts, “It’s exactly the kind of tour that will solidify their spot in the pantheon of arena-friendly bands.”

Last week, the acclaimed band debuted an acoustic version of their new single, “Beloved,” on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.” The intimate performance featured the band surrounded by fans performing “in the round”—a first for the program. They also performed an acoustic version of their #1 single, “Guiding Light,” as a bonus web exclusive.

Both “Beloved”—which is the #1 most added song this week at both Alternative and AAA radio—and “Guiding Light” are from the band’s new album, Delta, which debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200, Americana/Folk Albums, Alternative Rock Albums and Rock Albums charts with 230,000 equivalent album units earned (stream/purchase here). This is the band’s third consecutive #1 debut, the largest sales week for an alternative rock album in 2018 and the sixth-largest debut among all titles last year (Gentlemen of the Road/Glassnote Records).

“Dark and thrilling, this is their best album yet”—The Telegraph 
“Delta is the best album this band have made so far”—The Times

Portugal The Man

Portugal the Man at Ogren Park

Well, we’re two full months into 2017 and the world continues to burn like an avalanche of flaming biohazard material sliding down a mountain of used needles into a canyon full of rat feces. But hey, it’s not all bad: Portugal. The Man has a new album coming out called Woodstock.

PTM’s last album came out over three years ago—a long gap for a band who’ve dropped roughly an album a year since 2006. And in true, prolific band fashion, they’ve spent almost every minute since 2013 working on an album called Gloomin + Doomin. They created a shit-ton of individual songs, but as a whole, none of them hung together in a way that felt right. Then John Gourley, PTM’s lead singer, made a trip home to Wasilla, Alaska, (Home of Portugal. The Man’s biggest fan, Sarah Palin) and two things happened that completely changed the album’s trajectory.

First, John got some parental tough love from his old man, who called John on the proverbial carpet or dogsled or whatever you put people on when you want to yell at them in Alaska. “What’s taking so long to finish the album?” John’s dad said. “Isn’t that what bands do? Write songs and then put them out?” Like fathers and unlicensed therapists tend to do, John’s dad cut him deep. The whole thing started John thinking about why the band seemed to be stuck on a musical elliptical machine from hell and, more importantly, about how to get off of it.

Second, fate stuck its wiener in John’s ear again when he found his dad’s ticket stub from the original 1969 Woodstock music festival. It seems like a small thing, but talking to his dad about Woodstock ’69 knocked something loose in John’s head. He realized that, in the same tradition of bands from that era, Portugal. The Man needed to speak out about the world crumbling around them. With these two ideas converging, the band made a seemingly bat-shit-crazy decision: they took all of the work they had done for the three years prior and they threw it out.

It wasn’t easy and there was the constant threat that the band’s record label might have them killed, but the totally insane decision paid off. With new, full-on, musical boners, the band went back to the studio—working with John Hill (In The Mountain In The Cloud), Danger Mouse (Evil Friends), Mike D (Everything Cool), and longtime collaborator Casey Bates (The one consistent producer since the first record). In this new-found creative territory, the album that became Woodstock rolled out naturally from there

Remember that mountain of burning needles we were talking about? Good. Because Woodstock is an album (Including the new single “Feel It Still”) that—with optimism and heart—points at the giant pile and says, “Hey, this pile is fucked up!” And if you think that pile is fucked up too, you owe it to yourself—hell, to all of us—to get out there and do something about it.