Logjam Presents

The Brothers Comatose

Goodnight, Texas

Top Hat

Missoula, MT
Add to Calendar 10/25/2019 22:00 10/26/2019 01:00 America/Boise The Brothers Comatose

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome The Brothers Comatose live in concert at the Top Hat on Friday, October 25, 2019. Tickets are on sale now at The Top Hat, online or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. All tickets are general admission standing room only with limited bench seating available on a first come first served basis. All ages… Continue Reading

Logjam Presents - Missoula, Montana false MM/DD/YYYY
9:00PM (door) 10:00PM (show)
$15 (Adv.) $18 (DOS) + applicable fees
All Ages
Tickets

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome The Brothers Comatose live in concert at the Top Hat on Friday, October 25, 2019.

Tickets are on sale now at The Top Hatonline or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. All tickets are general admission standing room only with limited bench seating available on a first come first served basis. All ages are welcome.

Additional ticketing and venue information can be found here.

About The Brothers Comatose

Whether traveling to gigs on horseback or by tour bus, Americana mavens The Brothers Comatoseforge their own path with raucous West Coast renderings of traditional bluegrass, country and rock ‘n’ roll music. The five-piece string band is anything but a traditional acoustic outfit with their fierce musicianship and rowdy live shows reminiscent of stadium rock concerts. In fall 2017, “Campfire Caravan” featuring The Brothers Comatose, Mipso, and The Lil Smokies hosts three of today’s foremost emerging indie Americana bands as they trek across the United States to more than 30 cities. “Campfire Caravan” honors the musicians’ early days playing music, when they’d perform for friends and family in basements, living rooms, and around campfires. “Campfire Caravan” celebrates the American tradition of gathering communities around music.

Following three critically acclaimed full-length studio albums (Songs From The Stoop, Respect The Van, City Painted Gold), the five-piece string band disrupts the traditional album cycle and focuses their 2017/2018 release schedule on a series of strategically released songs. Produced by indie-rock legend John Vanderslice, the first four new songs to be released in 2017 include the sun-soaked new single “Don’t Make Me Get Up And Go” that channels harmony vanguards The Beach Boys.

“Cedarwood Pines” is an early-‘70s-esque alt-country number reminiscent of a George Harrison, post-Beatles sensibility. A new music video for “Cedarwood Pines” captures the band’s recent horseback tour across California’s gold country in the Sierra Nevada Foothills featuring beautiful California vistas, saloon and events center gigs, and the band of brothers loving life out on the range with their characteristic whimsical charm.

“Get Me Home” reflects the struggle for commitment and fidelity in a relationship that has to survive the rigors of artists hitting the road while their partners are at home. Life as a nationally touring act has its extreme highs and lows. As the days go on with show after show, relationships must bear increasing distance, temptations, and loneliness. Despite crazy schedules and differing experiences between two lovers, “Get Me Home” keeps the gravity of being faithful and remembering the promises made at the center of one’s life while touring the world.

Beautiful acoustic guitar work and crooning baritone vocals from lead singer Ben Morrison opens up “Joshua Tree.” An escapist tale for a couple weighed down by the burdens of big city life, “Joshua Tree”hones in on how simple pleasures become amplified when experienced in a magical desert world such as Joshua Tree, CA. Running through the sand, drinking cold wine, dreaming about the sun, there isn’t a worry in the world. Even with city life weighing you down, “Joshua Tree” celebrates a destination where you can leave your concerns at the door and focus on what’s important.

The Brothers Comatose is comprised of brothers Ben Morrison (guitar, vocals) and Alex Morrison(banjo, vocals), Gio Benedetti (bass, vocals), Philip Brezina (violin), and Ryan Avellone (mandolin). When they’re not headlining The Fillmore for a sold-out show or appearing at Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival, the band is out on the road performing across America, Canada, Australia, and hosting their very own music festival, Comatopia. In 2018, The Brothers Comatose traveled Asia for a month of cultural music exchange and education with American Music Abroad, a program directed by the State Department.

Goodnight, Texas

Conventional wisdom says the two frontmen of a band shouldn’t live on opposite sides of the United States, but that’s never seemed to deter Avi Vinocur and Patrick Dyer Wolf.

Goodnight, Texas is a band whose strength lies in unexpected sweet spots. Drawing their name from Pat and Avi’s onetime geographic midpoint (the real town of Goodnight in the State of Texas, a tiny hamlet east of Amarillo), the four-piece also exists at the center of its songwriters’ contrasting styles — via a 1913 Gibson A mandolin and a 2015 Danelectro, at the crossroads of folk and blues and rock ‘n’ roll, in a place where dry wit and dark truths meet hope and utmost sincerity.

Conductor is GNTX’s third full-length. It’s ambitious, dynamic, and more electrically inclined than 2012’s A Long Life of Living or 2014’s Uncle John Farquhar, carrying the listener from barn-burner to soul-searcher to banjo ballad and back again, all built on a powerful foundation from bassist Scott Griffin Padden and drummers Alex Nash and Kyle Caprista. It’s a record colored by grief, confusion, joy, the weight of the world: in the four years since the band’s last release, they lost Pat’s dad, Avi’s grandfather, and Scott’s mom. Pat and his wife had a baby boy. Alex became a professional baseball umpire. Britain left the EU and Donald Trump is the president of the United States.

But Conductor is, more accurately, a record about turning points — personal, political, musical, global — and their possibilities. A Long Life of Living drew inspiration from the Civil War and Appalachia; Uncle John Farquhar, from family lore, in the midwest in the late 1800s. Conductor wanders through the American Southwest in the early decades of the 20th century. It’s a moment when the United States has claimed the land from sea to shining sea, poised to become the world power, a great furnace of both progress and destruction. Electricity is coming into its own. The world’s population is about to explode. Against a backdrop of desert sunsets from a century ago, these songs exist on a precipice — as do their creators, as does the listener, as do we all.

-Emma Silvers