Logjam Presents

Flogging Molly & The Interrupters

Tiger Army

The Skints

KettleHouse Amphitheater

Missoula, MT
Add to Calendar 09/13/2022 18:30 09/14/2022 01:00 America/Boise Flogging Molly & The Interrupters

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome Flogging Molly & The Interrupters for a live concert performance at the KettleHouse Amphitheater on Tuesday, September 13, 2022. Tickets go on sale Friday, March 18, 2022 at 10:00AM at The Top Hat, online, or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. General Admission standing pit tickets, reserved stadium seating… Continue Reading

Logjam Presents - Missoula, Montana false MM/DD/YYYY
5:30PM (door) 6:30PM (show)
$39.50-$49.50 (Adv.) + applicable fees
All Ages
Tickets Groove Shuttle / Parking

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome Flogging Molly & The Interrupters for a live concert performance at the KettleHouse Amphitheater on Tuesday, September 13, 2022.

Tickets go on sale Friday, March 18, 2022 at 10:00AM at The Top Hat, online, or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. General Admission standing pit tickets, reserved stadium seating tickets, and general admission lawn tickets are available. Shuttle and parking tickets for this event are also available for advance purchase here. All ages are welcome.

*Please note that shuttles for Flogging Molly will begin at 5pm MT, instead of 4:30pm. Additional shuttle information available here

Available Ticket Types:

General Admission Pit: General admission pit tickets allow access to the standing room only section located directly in front of the stage.

Reserved Stadium Seating: Reserved Stadium seating tickets allow access to the reserved, stadium-style seating section located just behind the main pit of the amphitheater.

General Admission Lawn: General Admission Lawn tickets allow access to the upper standing section of the amphitheater located just above the reserved stadium seating section.

Additional ticketing and venue information can be found here.

All concerts are held rain or shine. Be prepared for extremes such as sunshine, heat, wind or rain. All tickets are non-refundable. In the event of cancellation due to extreme weather, tickets will not be refunded.

About Flogging Molly

Flogging Molly is comprised of Dave King (lead vocals, acoustic guitar, bodhran), Bridget Regan (violin, tin whistle, vocals), Dennis Casey (guitar, vocals), Matt Hensley (accordion, concertina, vocals), Nathen Maxwell (bass guitar, vocals), Spencer Swain (mandolin, banjo, guitar, vocals), and Mike Alonso (drums, percussion). Starting out as the house band for Molly Malone’s in Los Angeles and building a loyal following through endless touring, Flogging Molly has become a staple in the punk scene over the past 20 years, kicking off with its raucous debut showcase, Swagger, and continuing through it’s five additional studio albums. With numerous late-night television appearances under their belt, its sell-out Salty Dog Cruise through the Caribbean, and yearly St. Patrick’s Day Festival in Los Angeles, the band is currently working on the Rise Records follow-up to its latest LP, Life Is Good. Recently, the band reissued Swagger with exclusive tracks, an Irish traditional set, a 60-minute video feature, and exclusive merch in a collectable box set.

About The Interupters

Fight the Good Fight, the third studio album from Los Angeles ska-punk band The Interrupters, is available now via Hellcat Records. Fight the Good Fight was produced by longtime collaborator, Rancid frontman, and Grammy Award-winning producer Tim Armstrong with the band at Ship-Rec Recorders in Los Angeles. The album was mixed by Grammy-award winning mixer Tom Lord-Alge (Blink-182, Fall Out Boy, Weezer).

The follow-up to 2015’s Say It Out Loud, Fight the Good Fight finds The Interrupters delivering their two-tone-inspired, powerfully melodic, punk-fueled sound with more vitality than ever before. With Armstrong and Alge at the helm, Aimee and the Bivona brothers channeled the raw energy of their lives shows by recording almost entirely to tape. “There’s a certain feeling you get from that process that you can’t really get digitally,” says guitarist Kevin. “There’s no overthinking anything—everyone’s got to be fully present and committed. It was definitely high-pressure, but also really fun.”

Tiger Army

“I think at this point we’re sort of beyond genre,” says Nick 13 of his band Tiger Army and its new album V •••–The band’s first album since 2007’s Music From Regions Beyond, V •••– combines stellar production from Grammy winner Ted Hutt (Old Crow Medicine Show, The Gaslight Anthem, Dropkick Murphys) with impeccable playing via singer/guitarist Nick 13, bassist Dave Roe (Johnny Cash, Ray Lamontagne, Dan Auerbach) and drummer Mitch Marine (Dwight Yoakam).

With first track ‘Prisoner Of The Night’ already released and well received by audiences at current live shows, the freshness Nick 13 speaks of could not be more evident. Tiger Army’s music has always pushed forward creatively while nodding toward the roots of rock, but this time out, the band is drawing inspiration from the music of the early ‘60s—that pre-Beatles era when the likes of producer Joe Meek and the Shadows were in full bloom, or when a very young Del Shannon made his mark with his 1961 hit ‘Runaway.’ It is a musical period still ripe for rediscovery, and it masterfully evoked with full affection throughout V •••–.

“That whole era gets overlooked, I think,” he says. “Because there’s the narrative about the end of the ‘50s with Elvis going into the army, Eddie Cochran, Buddy Holly, and Ritchie Valens dying, Little Richard going to Gospel–that is all true, but the people who were able to carve out a niche for themselves before the British Invasion, and not just do the pure pop things, that to me was some of the most interesting music. And it was some of the most innovative as well. Because the first wave of rock ‘n’ roll was over, and everybody was trying to figure out what’s going to happen next. And I think there was a lot more experimentation, sonically and otherwise, than that era is generally given credit for.”

To that end, aficionados of early ‘60s pop might notice a few touches here and there: A familiar sounding keyboard tone via a rare Clavioline (“Max Crook, who played on Del Shannon’s records, used it,” says Nick. “It’s also what Joe Meek used in England on ‘Telstar.’ It took some doing to track one down in the States.”), and a high-pitched, ghostly female background vocal throughout several songs, courtesy of operatically-trained vocalist Savitri Labensart (“I think she brought an incredible element to the record,” He says. “Most female background singers that you find in rock ‘n’ roll today are usually R&B singers. That sort of high ethereal thing you hear on Joe Meek records and Roy Orbison records are a forgotten aspect of rock ‘n’ roll that I specifically wanted to bring back for this record.”)

Those occasional nods to Joe Meek were greatly aided by producer Hutt, an Englishman who rose to the challenge of attempting to evoke that singular style. “Something that’s interesting about Meek’s studio techniques is, a lot of times you’re just sort of unleashing something and you don’t know what you’re going to get. It’s not something that necessarily produces a predictable result, it’s more like you’re sort of setting up the circumstance where anything can happen–it might be great, it might not, but when it works, it really works.”

Also amply in evidence is the sound and influence of the legendary Roy Orbison, notably on ‘Happier Times,’ an album highlight. “It was probably Blue Velvet that turned me on to Roy Orbison,” notes Nick. “David Lynch picked up on something– there’s a real emotional darkness to his music, and that was something I latched onto pretty early. So I was listening to that alongside punk as a young kid.”

While V •••– is not a complete change of aesthetic direction for Tiger Army, it’s a further refinement, an evolution perhaps partly wrought from Nick 13’s other career as an alt-country/Americana artist. His self-titled solo album of 2011 won critical raves, expanded his audience via the touring that followed, and provided him some lessons for which he’s still grateful.

“I learned a lot,” he recalls. “In the solo thing, my intention was to immerse myself in country music of the ‘50s and ‘60s–but in doing so, I learned a lot more about not only how country music at that time was played, but how music of that time, not just country but rock ‘n’ roll, was played and recorded. And that was something that influenced this record most definitely.”

Notably having an impact here yet again was Orbison, whose early ‘60s Monument Records singles rank among his best and most pioneering.

“Before I spent time in Nashville, I never really spent time thinking about Roy Orbison as a Nashville artist,” says Nick. “I didn’t realize that all of his albums were recorded there. And really, a lot of the elements that they were using on those early Monument singles–the sort of non-R&B female background vocals, things like harp or piano that help give it that sort of otherworldly sound, were pretty much the same thing they were doing on other country records of the time–just minus the pedal steel.”

The Skints

The Skints are a four-piece reggae band from London, described by Clash Music as “the torchbearers for modern British reggae music.” Describing their own sound as “music from Jamaica in a London style,” The Skints mix reggae, ska and dub with touches of grime and hip-hop; a contemporary style that draws as much from the streets of the UK’s capital as it does from the Caribbean. Playing hundreds of shows since 2007, The Skints have had a steady rise from the UK underground, bringing their own rays of sunshine to festivals over Europe and beyond, with even The Guardian confirming that The Skints “brought the house down” at 2014’s Reading Festival.

Not bad going for a band who started out as friends at a culturally-mixed London school back in 2005, then teenagers knee-deep in an underground scene ruled by punk and ska music. It wasn’t long before the group’s record collections reached back across the history of rebel music to the likes of Johnny Clarke, Culture and The Abyssinians for altogether rootsier inspirations. Across an EP in 2008, and debut album Live, Breathe, Build, Believe in 2009, The Skints progressed from playing squats to stages and refined their identity from punk ragga urchins to become an outfit deemed “the most accessible pure British reggae music you’ll find these days” by A New TakePart & Parcel was the second full-length by the band and further built their fan base and opened doors to more touring, festivals and markets outside of the UK.

The Skints’ first album on Easy Star was their third full-length, the critically-acclaimed FM, released in 2015. Following that release, the band began touring more heavily in the U.S., quickly building buzz through tours with Sublime with Rome, Tribal Seeds, Easy Star All-Stars, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, and more.