Logjam Presents

The National

2020 Tour

Lucy Dacus

KettleHouse Amphitheater

Missoula, MT
Add to Calendar 07/25/2020 20:00 07/26/2020 01:00 America/Boise The National

Logjam Presents is excited to welcome The National to the KettleHouse Amphitheater for a live performance on Saturday, July 25, 2020. Tickets go on sale Friday, February 21st at 10AM at The Top Hat, online or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. General admission standing pit tickets, reserved stadium seating tickets and general admission lawn tickets are available. Shuttle and parking… Continue Reading

Logjam Presents - Missoula, Montana false MM/DD/YYYY
6:30PM (door) 8:00PM (show)
$42.50-$49.50 (Adv.) + applicable fees
All Ages
Tickets Shuttles / Parking

Logjam Presents is excited to welcome The National to the KettleHouse Amphitheater for a live performance on Saturday, July 25, 2020.

Tickets go on sale Friday, February 21st at 10AM at The Top Hatonline or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. General admission standing pit tickets, reserved stadium seating tickets and general admission lawn tickets are available. Shuttle and parking tickets for this event are also available for advance purchase here. All ages are welcome.

General Admission Pit: General admission pit tickets allow access to the standing room only section located directly in front of the stage.

Reserved Stadium Seating: Reserved Stadium seating tickets allow access to the reserved, stadium style seating section located just behind the main pit of the amphitheater.

General Admission Lawn: General Admission Lawn tickets allow access to the upper standing section of the amphitheater located just above the reserved stadium seating section.

Additional ticketing information and policies can be found here.

The National has partnered with PLUS1 to support delivering reproductive health care, sex education, and information to millions of people through Planned Parenthood.

Logjam Presents is proud to partner with Montana Trout Unlimited so that $1 from every ticket sold to KettleHouse Amphitheater events will go to the Blackfoot River Fund – a dedicated fund to conserve and protect the beautiful Blackfoot River. More info on the Blackfoot River Fund and its efforts can be found here.

All concerts are held rain or shine. Be prepared for extremes such as sunshine, heat, wind or rain. All tickets are non-refundable.

About The National

During their sixteen year career The National have sold over 1.7 million albums worldwide, they have established themselves as mainstays of arenas and festivals with sold-out performances and headlining slots around the world. Their most recent album and accompanying film ‘I Am Easy To Find’ was met with critical acclaim, and 2017’s ‘Sleep Well Beast’ won Best Alternative Music Album at the Grammy Awards and achieved #1’s in the UK, Ireland, Portugal and Canada.

Both individually and collectively The National’s members have been involved in countless artistic, charitable and socio-political pursuits.

The National consists of Matt Berninger (vocals) fronting two pairs of brothers: Aaron (guitar, bass, piano) and Bryce Dessner (guitar, piano), and Scott (bass, guitar) and Bryan Devendorf (drums).

2020 Tour

Lucy Dacus

Lucy Dacus at the Top Hat

You said, “Don’t go changing. I’ll rearrange to let you in and I’ll be your historian and you’ll be mine. And I’ll fill pages of scribbled ink, hoping the words carry meaning.” Then one day, the motorcade, covered in flower wreaths, first in a big parade, will come to take one of us away leaving the other with plenty to read.Lucy Dacus is done thinking small. Two years after her 2016 debut, No Burden, won her unanimous acclaim as one of rock’s most promising new voices, Dacus returns on March 2 with Historian, a remarkably assured 10-track statement of intent. It finds her unafraid to take on the big questions — the life-or-death reckonings, and the ones that just feel that way. It’s a record full of bracing realizations, tearful declarations and moments of hard-won peace, expressed in lyrics that feel destined for countless yearbook quotes and first tattoos.”This is the album I needed to make,” says Dacus, who views Historian as her definitive statement as a songwriter and musician. “Everything after this is a bonus.”She emphasizes that she does not take her newfound platform as a touring musician for granted.  “I have this job where I get to talk to people I don’t know every night,” she remembers thinking on the long van rides across America to support No Burden. Realizing that she would have a dramatically expanded audience for her second album, she felt an urgent call to make something worthwhile: “The next record should be the thing that’s most important to say.”The past year, with its electoral disasters and other assorted heartbreaks, has been a rough one for many of us, Dacus included. She found solace in crafting a thoughtful narrative arc for Historian, writing a concept album about cautious optimism in the face of adversity, with thematic links between songs that reveal themselves on repeat listens. “It starts out dark and ends hopeful, but it gets darker in between; it goes to the deepest, darkest, place and then breaks,” she explains. “What I’m trying to say throughout the album is that hope survives, even in the face of the worst stuff.”Dacus and her band recorded the album in Nashville last March, re-teaming with No Burden producer Collin Pastore, and mixed it a few months later with A-list studio wizard John Congleton. The sound they created, with substantial input from multi-instrumentalist and live guitarist Jacob Blizard, is far richer and fuller than the debut — an outward flowering of dynamic, living, breathing rock and roll. Dacus’ remarkable sense of melody and composition are the driving force throughout, giving Historian the immersive feel of an album made by an artist in full command of her powers.The album opens with a striking three-track run. First comes “Night Shift,” the only breakup song Dacus has ever written: “In five years I hope the songs feel like covers, dedicated to new lovers,” she memorably declares. Next is the catchy, upbeat first single “Addictions,” inspired in part by the dislocated feeling of life on the road and the lure of familiarity (“I’m just calling cause I’m used to it/And you’ll pick up cause you’re not a quitter…”), followed by “The Shell,” a reflection on (and embrace of) creative burnout. There’s nothing tentative about this opening sequence. Right away, it’s clear that Dacus is on a new level of truth-telling and melodic grace.Another key highlight is track five, “Yours & Mine” — “the centerpiece where the whole album hinges in on itself,” Dacus says. Using a call-and-response format, she wrestles with the question of how best to participate in a community broken by injustice and fear while staying true to what one believes is right. “It’s about realizing your power as a person, and deciding to do the less safe but ultimately more powerful move, which is to move physically forward — show up and march — and move forward politically,” says Dacus, who began writing the song during the 2015 Baltimore Uprising against systemic racism.Historian closes with two stunning songs: “Pillar of Truth,” a heartfelt tribute to Dacus’ late grandmother, and “Historians,” which sums up the album’s complex lessons about loss. “From the first song to ‘Pillar of Truth,’ the message is: You can’t avoid these things, so accept them. There’s ways to go about it with grace and gratefulness,” she says. “Then ‘Historians’ says that even if you can say that, there’s still fear, and loss is terrifying. You still love things, so it’s going to hurt. But dark isn’t bad. It’s good to know that.”