Logjam Presents

Halestorm

with Special Guests Stone Temple Pilots

Black Stone Cherry

KettleHouse Amphitheater

Missoula, MT
Add to Calendar 05/30/2022 19:00 05/31/2022 01:00 America/Boise Halestorm

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome Halestorm for a live concert performance at the KettleHouse Amphitheater on Monday, May 30, 2022. Tickets go on sale Friday, March 4, 2022 at 10:00 am at The Top Hat, online or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. General admission seated pit tickets, reserved stadium seating tickets and general admission… Continue Reading

Logjam Presents - Missoula, Montana false MM/DD/YYYY
6:00PM (door) 7:00PM (show)
$39.50-$59.50 (Adv.) + applicable fees
All Ages
Tickets Parking / Groove Shuttle

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome Halestorm for a live concert performance at the KettleHouse Amphitheater on Monday, May 30, 2022.

Tickets go on sale Friday, March 4, 2022 at 10:00 am at The Top Hat, online or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. General admission seated pit tickets, reserved stadium seating tickets and general admission lawn tickets are available. Shuttle and parking tickets for this event are also available for advance purchase here. All ages are welcome.

Available Ticket Types:

General Admission Standing Pit: General Admission Standing Pit tickets allow access to general admission standing located in the front section closest to the stage.

Reserved Stadium Seating: Reserved Stadium Seating tickets allow access to the reserved, stadium style seating section located just behind the main pit of the amphitheater.

General Admission Lawn: General Admission Lawn tickets allow access to the upper standing section of the amphitheater located just above the reserved stadium seating section.

Additional ticketing information and policies can be found here.

All concerts are held rain or shine. Be prepared for extremes such as sunshine, heat, wind or rain. All tickets are non-refundable. In the event of cancellation due to extreme weather, tickets will not be refunded.

About Halestorm

Self-doubt and depression clawed at the edges of Lzzy Hale’s mind when it came time to pen Halestorm’s fourth album, a follow-up to 2015’s Into The Wild Life. The musician didn’t feel like she was where she needed to be, both professionally and personally. When she and her bandmates, Arejay Hale, Joe Hottinger and Josh Smith, began writing, Lzzy wasn’t even sure who she was. “I kept thinking, ‘Can I still do this?’” she says. “I went down a lot of rabbit holes, and I’m my own worst critic. I needed to get over a lot of internal hurdles during this writing and recording process. This record was about overcoming inner demons.”

The band began writing, but the first batch of songs didn’t feel quite right, so Halestorm scrapped it and started over. And in the end, Vicious represents Halestorm’s most personal and most inventive album, a deeply lived-with collection of songs teaming with genuine heart and soul. It’s also how Lzzy got her groove back. “I don’t think there was any other way for me to get through that difficult time than to write about it,” she says. “This record was like therapy.” The album was recorded with producer Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Alice In Chains and Rush) at Nashville, TN’s Rock Falcon recording studio, and the producer, with whom the band had previously worked with on their 2017 covers EP ReAniMate 3.0: The CoVeRs eP, pushed each musician to a new place musically. Each song went through five or six versions, and ultimately carry the listener on a journey, emphasizing the band’s strengths while revealing a dynamic evolution.

“Nick pushed us from 10 to 11,” Lzzy says. “He pushed us mentally and physically. There are some things on this record that I didn’t think were physically possible for both myself and my bandmates. It was really exciting to see that happen for the first time in the studio. To be able to still surprise each other like that – and to surprise yourself – is no small feat.”

One of the main goals in the studio was to capture real, human moments within the music, the sorts of unexpected instances that occur onstage. In recent years, Halestorm has introduced improvised flashes into their live sets with the idea of creating controlled chaos between the more orchestrated songs. The music on Vicious embraces this sensibility. The musicians worked to ensure that every song had its own dynamic feeling, both overall and within each verse. “It wasn’t just about looping the same thing over and over again,” Lzzy notes. “The idea was: Where can we take this that’s not predicable?”

The resulting album, which was culled from over 20 recorded tunes, solidifies everything Halestorm stands for as a band. It’s about empowerment, an ideal that the musicians have encouraged for years, and the songs urge you to be unapologetically yourself. Ultimately, it’s not just about being strong and taking on the storm – but also about how you rise above that storm. The album’s title comes from “Vicious,” a gritty, surging rock number that was written during the last moments of studio time. The song features the line “What doesn’t kill me makes me vicious,” a rallying cry to overcome any obstacles. “It’s about being strong and fierce,” Lzzy says. “The climate of the world right now is always seeping in, so we wanted it to feel really positive and empowering.” “Uncomfortable,” one of the first songs written for the album, has a similar tone, featuring a rapid-fire verse and impressive vocal licks on the chorus. “You can’t please everybody as much as you may want to try,” Lzzy says of the song. “By being yourself you may make people uncomfortable. I saw a lot of our fans struggling with that. This song is saying that it’s okay to not make everyone happy all the time. You can be yourself and that’s okay. And, in fact, you should be proud of that.”

References to Halestorm’s fans and Lzzy’s constant interactions with them online or on Twitter thread through the album. The musician, who calls the band’s fanbase “our comrades in this crazy life,” wanted to drop Easter eggs into the lyrics, reminding longtime listeners of past conversations or instances in Lzzy’s personal life they’ll likely remember. “I feel like our fans deserve that type of openness from us at this point,” she says. “The love they’ve given us comes full circle.”

Since their inception in 1998, Halestorm have toured extensively with a diverse variety of artists, including Eric Church, Avenged Sevenfold, Alice Cooper, Rob Zombie, ZZ Top and Evanescence. They’ve played around 2,500 dates around the world to date, and performed at festivals like Taste of Chaos and Rockstar Energy Drink Uproar Festival. The band scored a Grammy for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance in 2013, and Lzzy was named the “Dimebag Darrell Shredder of the Year” at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods Awards in 2016. Both Halestorm and The Strange Case of… were certified Gold, further evidencing Halestorm’s massively supportive fanbase. Halestorm have also made history: “Love Bites (So Do I),” the hit single from The Strange Case of… ascended to No. 1 at Active Rock radio in the U.S., making Halestorm the first-ever female-fronted group to earn the top spot on the format.

Today Halestorm exists as a beacon of hope and inspiration for musicians, particularly female musicians who want to brave the challenges of the music industry. Lzzy has been a pioneer in rock and proven that women have a place on the stage. Every night on tour, women – and men – in the audience can look to her and realize they too have the power to carve out their own path. Younger musicians admire her the same way she grew up admiring artists like Joan Jett and Stevie Nicks. “They helped me feel like I could do it, and I hope I’ve done the same for women today,” Lzzy says. “Trying to be my best self and not trying to be anything I’m not and being unapologetic feels like a good message. I feel a lot of responsibility to keep upholding that. I’m just trying to be the best me.”

Two decades into an accomplished career, Halestorm represents the results of true passion and hard work. The band has out-survived many of its peers and the musicians are still having fun after all this time. Vicious is evidence of a group of artists who refuse to ever plateau.

“This music chose us and we’re just hanging on,” Lzzy says. “Our greatest accomplishment is that we’ve been the same members for over 15 years and we’re continuing to make and release music. We want to always try new things. We’re still extremely hungry and open to opportunities, and we’re hungry to prove we deserve to be here. We’re so lucky to still be a band and have people care about our music. And there’s still so much more to do.”

 

with Special Guests Stone Temple Pilots

About Stone Temple Pilots

Stone Temple Pilots embark upon a new sonic adventure with Perdida, the band’s first-ever acoustic album. It includes 10 deeply personal songs that weave introspective lyrics together with unexpected instruments to take listeners on an emotional and musical journey through letting go and starting over.

“You have to live it to write it,” says guitarist Dean Deleo. “And this record is a reflection of where we’ve been recently.”

Bassist Robert DeLeo says Perdida (Spanish for ‘loss’) shows how music has helped them process grief, search for meaning and, ultimately, create something beautiful from the pain. “When I’ve gone through things in my life, I’ve found that sitting down and having an honest conversation with my guitar is the best therapy.”

“Recording an acoustic album like Perdida is something the band has wanted to do for many years,” says drummer Eric Kretz. “We performed on ‘MTV Unplugged’ in 1993, and we usually play acoustic mini-sets on tour, so when Robert and Dean started playing their new songs for us during our tour last year, we knew right away they would be perfect for an acoustic album.”

Writing lyrics for an introspective album like Perdida meant exposing himself like never before, says singer Jeff Gutt, who joined the band in 2017. “It’s an emotionally honest album and I needed to approach it that way for these songs to resonate. I had to let myself be as vulnerable writing the lyrics as Dean and Robert were writing the music.”

To record Perdida, the quartet assembled at Kretz’s Bomb Shelter Studios in February. The key to making the album, Dean explains, was finding a way to say more with less. “Everything you hear serves a purpose, from the space in the arrangements to the different instruments. We only added things that served the songs.”

As a result, there are instruments on Perdida that you don’t normally hear on an STP record, like flute (“I Didn’t Know The Time,”) alto saxophone (“Years,”) guitarrón (“Miles Away,”) and enough vintage keyboards to make Rick Wakeman jealous. “We’ve done similar things before – like the trumpet solo on ‘Adhesive’ from Tiny Music – but never on such a large scale,” Robert says. “Working with other musicians on this album was such a joy because it gave us a rare opportunity to hear our songs through someone else’s ears.”

That approach shines on the title track, where a nylon-string guitar takes the lead as keyboard, violin, viola and cello ebb and flow behind Gutt’s soaring vocal on the chorus: “Oh perdida come and go/Stay with me tonight/But in the morning please be gone.”

“She’s My Queen” is another highpoint on the band’s sonic adventure. Built around an Indian drone and carried along by a gently pulsing beat, the song casts a hypnotic spell that’s punctuated by background singers, flute and Marxophone – a special kind of hammered dulcimer from the 1920s.

The songs that open and close Perdida – “Fare Thee Well” and “Sunburst” respectively – are fitting bookends, Gutt says. “They really capture the emotional journey that takes place on this album. It starts with saying goodbye on ‘Fare Thee Well’ and ends with a new beginning on ‘Sunburst.’ It’s a melancholy record, but it ends on a hopeful note.”

As it happens, those two tracks also spotlight facets of the DeLeo brothers’ distinctive songwriting voices. “Fare Thee Well” by Robert pulls you in from the first strum of the guitar and has you singing along after one listen. In Dean’s “Sunburst,” the melody unfolds gradually, rising and falling multiple times before building to a cathartic guitar-fueled crescendo.

In addition to the album, Stone Temple Pilots will also launch an acoustic tour in early 2020.

“Some songs are obvious candidates for an acoustic performance,” Dean says. “What will be really interesting are the unexpected choices, where we reimagine a familiar song and present in a totally different light.”

Kretz says the band is looking forward to not only performing the new songs, but also pulling songs from previous albums into the setlist. “We’ll finally get a chance to play songs from our catalog that we’ve never played live, or in some cases, haven’t played live in more than 20 years.”

“We’ve talked about doing this kind of tour for years, and now it’s finally happening,” Robert explains. “We’re excited because it’s not only a chance for us to celebrate our new album in a special way, but also everything that’s brought us to this moment.”

Black Stone Cherry

About Black Stone Cherry

As the world plummeted into the COVID-19 pandemic, the four members of Black Stone Cherry were nestled deep in the woods of Kentucky, scrambling to complete their 7th album. There, they could feel the disease closing in as they watched the news daily, and it became apparent the album they were finishing featured lyrics that were eerily prescient. The resulting 13-track record is broadly emotive, and anthemic. It was finished just before the global lockdown was imposed, and it’s aptly titled, The Human Condition

“There was a real urgency and fear of the unknown during those sessions—it was a scary time,” recalls drummer, John Fred Young. “Every song on this album tells a story of the experiences we all go through—our happiness, our struggles, and how we have to adapt.” Sonically, The Human Condition is also one of BSC’s most visceral and hooky albums. Adds guitarist/vocalist Ben Wells: “With this one, we cranked up the amps, the drums are in your face, and there are some really heavy riffs. After 19 years and 7 albums, we wanted to prove that we still kick ass. This album feels like a rebirth.” 

In the past two decades, Black Stone Cherry has set a new standard for Southern rock, revitalizing the tradition with burly riffs and stirring rock hooks. Since their formation in 2001, the four-piece brotherhood has remained Chris Robertson, vocals/guitar; Ben Wells, guitar/vocals; Jon Lawhon, bass/vocals; and John Fred Young, drums.  Though not blood relatives, the guys grew up together, immersed in the culture of shit-kicking rock n’ roll. Young’s dad Richard, and his Uncle Fred, are two founding members of the iconic country-fried rock n’ roots band The Kentucky HeadHunters, and the high school-aged boys came up bashing away on their instruments in the group’s notorious Practice House, a 1940s bungalow. 

The four-piece band have blazed their own way in establishing a legacy. In the US, BSC’s last album, Family Tree, debuted at #8 in the Current Rock Albums, #4 at Current Hard Music, and #21 Top Current Album. The band’s 3 previous studio albums have cracked the Top 10 in the UK. Family Tree hit number 11 in Germany’s album charts, the highest position ever for the group in the country. Onstage, Black Stone Cherry has both headlined and rocked 12,000-cap arena shows and shared the stage with a diverse roster of superstars, including Alter Bridge, Theory of a Deadman, Def Leppard, Gov’t Mule, Nickelback, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Bad Company, Mötorhead, and ZZ Top. In 2018, BSC performed in front of 100,000 people at Download Festival as main support to Guns N’ Roses. The guys also have the added distinction of being the musical spokespeople for the Professional Bull Riders Association, they have recorded the organization’s theme song, and members of BSC frequently appear at PBR events. 

The Human Condition was self-produced and tracked in bassist Jon Lawhon’s recording facility, Monocle Studios, in March 2020. The guys went in with 4 songs, wrote new songs, and recorded some beloved unreleased favorites. The production and performances on the album are some of BSC’s fiercest and finest. For the first time, the band opted to not record basics live and instead meticulously multitracked. Each member endured grueling sessions to ensure the collective studio mindset of achieving “epic performances.” The results are stunning—the grooves feel organic, the riffs are mountainous, the performances are urgent, and the hooks shine through gloriously. 

The album’s opening lyrics are: “People, people your attention please, I need to tell you about a new disease.” These words come via the muscularly melodic “Ringin’ In My Head.” The song was written 4 years ago, but it powerfully captures the hysteria around the COVID-19 outbreak. Heightening the drama here is a dexterously explosive fleet-fingered guitar solo. On “Push Down & Turn,” BSC masterfully use space to achieve crushing swamp-metal dynamics. The stirring song is truly a human condition track as it talks about mental health, boldly advocating for getting treatment if you’re struggling. “I suffer from manic depression, and I have severe anxiety. I want to convey it’s okay to go to a doctor and talk about these issues. There is no shame or stigma there,” Chris Robertson shares.  

The Human Condition is rounded out by a pair of goose-bump inducing, Southern-fried ballads. “In Love With The Pain” conjures the late-night longing balladry of 38 Special. “If My Heart Had Wings” vibes the grandeur of late 1980s/early 1990s Aerosmith. One other Human Condition highpoint is the guys’ raucously rocking rendition of  ELO’s “Don’t Bring Me Down.” Here, the song’s hooks and strutting groove are perfectly paired with BSC’s inimitable Southern rock swagger. The album concludes with the anthemic “Keep On Keepin’ On,” a song that’s every bit as uplifting as its title promises.

“When I listen back to this record, I feel all these different emotions,” Jon Lawhon says. “We started when we were teens, and life has taken its course, especially now. Through it all, your heart and your perspectives change, but one thing that hasn’t changed is our connection as friends.” Chris affirms: “This is a brotherhood. It’s been amazing to stick around with all four original members and still be inspired. Here’s to 7 more albums and another 19 years!”