Logjam Presents

of Montreal

with Locate S,1

The Wilma

Missoula, MT
Add to Calendar 09/19/2022 20:00 09/20/2022 01:00 America/Boise of Montreal

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome of Montreal for a live in concert performance at The Wilma on Monday, September 19, 2022. Tickets are on sale now at The Top Hat, online, or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. All tickets are general admission only. All ages are welcome. Additional ticketing and venue information can… Continue Reading

Logjam Presents - Missoula, Montana false MM/DD/YYYY
7:00PM (door) 8:00PM (show)
$22 (Adv.) $25 (DOS) + applicable fees
All Ages
Tickets

Logjam Presents is pleased to welcome of Montreal for a live in concert performance at The Wilma on Monday, September 19, 2022.

Tickets are on sale now at The Top Hat, online, or by phone at 1 (800) 514-3849. All tickets are general admission only. All ages are welcome.

Additional ticketing and venue information can be found here.

About of Montreal

When creators f<ck with how we experience time and space, great fictions emerge: H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine, the Terminator franchise, Avengers: Endgame. But what happens to artists when the flow of time gets f^cked up IRL? When an hour stretches into eternity, and the voices in your head begin to echo through empty rooms?

If you’re Kevin Barnes, the creative visionary behind of Montreal, Freewave Lucifer f<ck f^ck f>ck happens.

Isolation and uncertainty loomed throughout the genesis of the band’s latest studio album. “The experience of just trying to keep my head above water and navigate through the last couple years played a huge role in this record,” says Barnes.

These expansive selections contrast markedly with the focused pop of 2020’s UR FUN, which was crafted for visceral thrills and the concert stage. As it was for countless musicians around the world, the inability to tour eliminated one of the linchpins of Barnes’ creative process. “I didn’t know if we’d ever tour again, so I didn’t consider that side of things.” Denied social interaction and diverse experiences, Barnes delved inward.

Barnes contemplated how time functions in music and experimented accordingly. These new songs, dense with ideas but short on repetition, feel epic in scope despite reasonable running times. Like the staircases of M.C. Escher’s Relativity, the discrete sections of “Marijuana’s A Working Woman” and “Blab Sabbath Lathe of Maiden” crisscross and pivot, confounding the senses yet commanding attention.

The imagery and sentiments that bubble forth from Barnes’ lyrical wordplay prove equally disorienting. “Is it important to say black chrome rodents?,” asks Barnes on “Après The Déclassé.” Phrases borne of free association took on new meaning when introduced into a song. “It’s like collaborating with my subconscious in a way. It feels deeply personal, even though I don’t necessarily understand it at that moment.”

“Marijuana’s A Working Woman” juxtaposes oddball funk a la Zapp or Rick James with nods to Alice Anne Baily’s 19th century spiritualism. “Modern Art Bewilders” zigzags between baroque psychedelic idyll and synthpop tantrum, equal parts Sgt. Pepper’s and Gary Numan. Other influences woven throughout include realist painter Edward Hopper, fantasy author Ursula K. Le Guin, cinéaste Pedro Almodovar, and erotic illustrator Toshio Saeki.

Barnes likens their compositional process to making collages from seemingly unrelated source materials, combining them in provocative ways to reveal new meanings. “I wasn’t working with specific themes that I wanted to try and stretch over a three-minute pop song. It was sewing together a lot of fragmented thoughts,” which ties in nicely to the ‘freewave’ aspect of the album title’s meaning. As Barnes explains,

“Freewave is my term for wild and intractable artistic expression. Lucifer is the angel of enlightenment and elucidation. Fuck is something we say when things are going really well, or really badly.”

As for anything else going on behind the scenes during the genesis of Freewave Lucifer f<ck f^ck f>ck, Barnes opts to preserve the mystery. “Sometimes in the past, I felt it was important for people to know certain things, so they could get into a specific headspace.” Not this time. “The last couple of years laid a heavy trip on everybody’s psyche. There are plenty of universal things here to identify with.”

with Locate S,1

with Locate S,1 Image

About Locate S,1

Set for a digital release via Sybaritic Peer on April 20th, and on LP/CD on May 18th via Nicey Music, Healing Contest is the brand new album from Christina Schneider, who appears here under her Locate S,1 moniker. Recorded with Of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes, the new album is preceded by lead track “Owe It 2 The Girls”, a gleaming, skewed, pop gem; the kind of playful and purposeful four-minutes that immediately hooks you in to the idiosyncratic world it introduces.

Informed by a sparkling guitar line that seems to permeate throughout, pertinently shaping the overall landscape, the track is led by Schneider’s dexterous and delightful voice, one that feels like a character in itself, effervescent and teaming with life. There’s real depth here too; dig inside that bright exterior and “Owe It 2 The Girls” is an evocative statement of intent, the exquisiteness of its creation juxtaposed by a biting undercurrent laying half-hidden in the lyrics: “You need ego death, not a new girlfriend. You say your mother called me a cliche, now that I’m evil I can say you treat her the same way.”

A brilliantly alluring introduction, you can stream “Owe It 2 The Girls” via its new video below right now; here’s a little extra context to the whole thing courtesy of Christina Schneider herself:

I wasn’t planning on making a video for “Owe it 2 the Girls” and then my friend Molly Lehmann sent me this video and I knew what had to be done. Clayton Rychlik (who’s drumming on the track) and JoJo Glidewell (keyboards on much of the album) filmed everything with two VHS Camcorders – one broken – at their house in Athens, GA and AC Carter rounded up a delightful crew of femme-identifying friends to dance together. I’m not much for gender essentialism but who can deny the blissful feeling of drowning out maleness.